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How our cities’ sanitation problem is damaging health

The piece highlights how having a sound fecal sludge management system is of utmost importance in densely populated areas, where most residents are often not connected to conventional sewer networks. Madhu says, “based on the data culled by the Centre for Science and Environment through a survey of close to 75 cities, between 70-90% of our human waste goes untreated into the environment. The collected and untreated material is usually dumped in the nearest water body or open area, sometimes even in farmer fields all of which is hazardous to safe and healthy living. Government and citizens have to act together to solve for the problem.”

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Tapping Into New-Age Aspirations

India cannot change for the better if its women are not given opportunities to realise their potential. Let's put young women at the front of our minds and in our policy-planning,. Because, when women thrive, India will too.

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Teach to Reach: A Story of Immunization Training

Today, global organizations, development partners, and national governments still spend millions of dollars annually to support trainings utilizing an outdated, didactic ‘cascade style’ model – the same one we have been using since the Expanded Programme on Immunization began in 1974. Yet, there is no evidence to suggest that this model is working.

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Innovation: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Impact - Shedding New Light on Child Brain Development

Given the incredible scientific advances we read about every day in field after field, it’s stunning how little we know about certain things. One of the fields where we have the most to learn is brain development. Dr. Clare Elwell, a professor of medical physics at University College London, has an idea that may help open up this black box around babies’ brains—and, eventually, start driving down the number of children who are cognitively impaired.

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Innovation: Everything Old is New Again

When we think about scientific innovation, we tend to imagine the future: new drugs, ground-breaking methods, technologies that push the boundaries of what is possible. But good researchers don’t just look forward; they also reach into the past for inspiration—sometimes centuries into the past. That’s exactly what Dr. Miguel Prudêncio and his colleagues at Lisbon’s Instituto de Medicina Molecular are doing to create a approach to malaria vaccine development: they’re taking their cue from the very first vaccine.

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