Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Categories / Health

Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health

How Empowered Women Changed the World

Going back at least to Thomas Malthus, who published his An Essay on the Principle of Population in 1798, people have worried about doomsday scenarios in which food supply can’t keep up with population growth.

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Motorbikes Speed Up HIV Test Results In Malawi

Improvements to Malawi’s network for transporting laboratory samples will help people living with HIV get vital test results quicker.

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Imams in Senegal Are Not against Family Planning

In Senegal, we have not been brainwashed by international donors to support family planning. Our primary interest is the well-being of the people of our country.

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Thank a Health Worker – Unsung Heroes of Global Health

In celebrating World Health Worker Week, we're reminded of the challenge of addressing the health workforce crises to meet the global health priorities of USAID.

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Managing Primary Health Care at Scale: Myanmar’s Sun Quality Network

In 2008, the Gates Foundation decided to invest in Myanmar’s primary health care with a grant to Population Services International (PSI) to expand their primary care services nationwide, helping to ensure the people of Myanmar had access to high-quality, low-cost basic health care.

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New WHO Report Provides Road Map for Effective Vaccine Introductions

In the mid-1990s, when I started working with the World Health Organization (and at that time, the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, a pre-cursor to the current GAVI Alliance) on trying to accelerate the uptake of the Hib meningitis vaccine, there were a lot of barriers and concerns. Often, we heard that the existing immunization system was a “house of cards” and that introducing a new vaccine would risk pulling down the whole system. On the other hand, proponents of moving faster (like me) wondered whether the introduction of a new vaccine might, rather than adding strain, actually energize the system and increase coverage. As it turns out, both of the groups debating the impact of new vaccine introduction on health systems in the 1990s were wrong. In a paper released by a WHO working group last year, Jessica Shearer and colleagues conducted a rigorous statistical analysis of all available data, and concluded that the introduction of new vaccines did not result in a pronounced effect on routine immunization coverage.

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