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Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Topics / Postsecondary Education

A high school education is not enough to compete in today’s global economy. Yet by age 30 most Americans have not earned a college degree or certificate. Our Postsecondary Success Strategy aims to dramatically increase the number of young adults who complete their postsecondary education, setting them up for success in the workplace and in life.

Learn more below and visit the program page for more details about our work in this area.

Back to School for the New Majority in Higher Ed

By 2025, our workforce will be short as many as 11 million credentialed workers unless we significantly increase the number of students getting to and through college. And that means that we must do a better job of serving the new majority of students--including those students who have children or are balancing a part- or full-time job. These students bring high but often fragile aspirations to colleges and universities that too often are not equipped to meet their needs.

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Enhancing and Accelerating the Impact of Digital Learning in Higher Ed

EdSurge recently launched a deeper focus on postsecondary education and is launching a virtual practitioner network - the Digital Learning Network - to help the higher education community collaborate and learn from one another.

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Driving Toward Degrees through Better Advising

Discover new higher ed advising tools that enhance student success. Visit http://drivetodegree.org/.

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Connecting the Bridges to Nowhere: Cultivating Student Success Through an Enhanced Postsecondary Data Ecosystem

Disconnected data systems leave students and families struggling to answer critical questions about higher ed. Learn how the Institute for Higher Education Policy is tackling this issue.

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Know Your Numbers - Empowering Student Success

If key decision-makers knew their numbers, they could better track student progress and develop interventions that would lead to more successful and equitable student outcomes.

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