Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Topics / Agricultural Development

Approximately 1 billion people live in chronic hunger and more than 1 billion live in extreme poverty. Many are small farmers in the developing world. Their success or failure determines whether they have enough to eat, are able to send their children to school, and can earn any money to save.

Learn more below and visit the program page for more details about our work in this area.

MUSIC VIDEO: African Celebrities Sing In Support of Farmers

When you think agriculture in Africa, “star-studded” probably isn’t the first adjective that springs to mind. So you can imagine my surprise when I arrived in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in January for the African Union Summit’s launch of the Year of Agriculture and Food Security and discovered that the program included names like Nigerian hip hop artist D’banj and footballer Yaya Touré

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Shining the Spotlight on Seasonal Hunger

In addressing poverty and chronic hunger, we must not forget methods to tackle the issue of seasonal hunger, such as supporting vulnerable families to grow subsistence as wellas cash crops.

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Food Security and Nutrition and the Post-2015 Development Goals

Next week will see a key event related to the process to envision the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. Government officials will gather in New York for a meeting of the Open Working Group to debate ideas in 19 different areas, including food and nutrition security.

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Closing Africa’s Agricultural Gender Gap

Africa’s GDP is now growing faster than any other continent’s. When many people think about the engines driving that growth, they imagine commodities like oil, gold, and cocoa, or maybe industries like banking and telecommunications. I think of a woman named Joyce Sandir.

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Innovation: A Solution to the World's Most Persistent Health and Development Challenges

We look forward to a world in which having access to the nutrients needed for a child to thrive will no longer be a question, but a fact of life. Innovation can help us get there.

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