Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Authors / Biography
EngmannCyril_db

Cyril Engmann

Title Senior Program Officer, Neonatal Health
Organization Gates Foundation

Prior to joining the Foundation, Dr. Engmann  was Attending Neonatologist and Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Maternal Child Health at the Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He graduated from University College and Middlesex School of Medicine in London, UK and undertook his postgraduate medical training in the UK and subsequently the US, where he completed his Pediatrics Residency and a Neonatology Fellowship at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Dr. Engmann has been Principal Investigator of a number of complex, international, community-based grants focused on maternal and newborn health in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia, funded by the NIH, WHO and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
In addition to an active research agenda, Dr. Engmann is involved in many systems improvement/implementation science programs internationally, lectures widely in public health, pediatrics and newborn health, and was on the Board of Directors of Kybele, an NGO committed to improving maternal and child health through medical educational partnerships. He also directed the University of North Carolina-ChildFund Maternal Child Health program which provides technical backstopping to ChildFunds activities in over 30 countries.
Dr. Engmann has received many grants to execute research and programmatic endeavors and has over 70 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters. He is an advisor to the WHO on verbal autopsy and newborn infections in Africa, an external examiner for the University of Queensland, Australia and Malawi College MPH programs, and an ad hoc reviewer for medical journal such the Lancet, International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Journal of Perinatology, Tropical Medicine and International Health, among others.
Dr. Engmann is passionate about maternal, newborn and child health, education, research and capacity building and runs research training workshops at events such as the Global Health Council conferences in Washington, the Global Health Education Consortium and INDEPTH network annual scientific meetings.
He is a Member of the Society for Pediatric Research and Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr Engmann speaks 4 languages, continues to be an active clinician, and enjoys his family, sports (soccer, squash, racquetball, table-tennis, badminton, tennis and swimming), classical music, cooking and reading.

Posts By Cyril Engmann

Busting Myths: Taking Kangaroo Mother Care to the Next Level

Thirty-five years after its introduction, Kangaroo Mother CAre is still a practice that is sputtering through even the introductory phase (globally less than one percent use), in part because of a widely accepted myth that it is only a hospital-based, medical intervention for premature babies.

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Blending Science and Culture to Speed Adoption of Kangaroo Care

Kangaroo mother care promotes maternal-infant bonding and physiological stability in the newborn, facilitates breastfeeding, provides warmth, reduces risk of serious infections and mortality of premature infants by about 50 percent.

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Blending Science and Culture to Accelerate Kangaroo Mother Care

In Istanbul, Turkey, a city where East meets West, and emblematic of our challenge to meld state-of-the-art science with age-old parental instincts to provide newborn children with food, warmth and love, a group came together in October, 2013, to “bend the curve” on newborn survival through acceleration of adoption of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC).

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Accelerating Global Practice of Kangaroo Mother Care

If universal KMC coverage was achieved, it is estimated that it could save the lives of more than 450,000 preterm newborns each year.

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Global Newborn Action (with a) Plan

What we don’t want out of this process is a pretty document sitting on a shelf somewhere and dusted off periodically. We need a plan that addresses actionable steps, with strong, measurable outcomes that have an impact on newborn lives.

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